Oliver Wyman Sucks Customer Reviews and Feedback

From Everything.Sucks

Oliver Wyman is an American management consulting firm. Founded in New York City in 1984, the firm has more than 60 offices in Europe, North America, the Middle East, and Asia-Pacific, employing over 5,000 professionals. It ranks among the best strategy consulting firms in the world in terms of prestige, growth, and employee satisfaction. The firm is part of the Oliver Wyman Group.

A former employee mentioned, "Oliver Wyman is the sweatshop boutique consulting firm you have heard about at an international scale. This sweatshop atmosphere is layered on top of a culture where it is difficult to trust/believe anything that individual managers or firm leaders tell you. If everything internally were how it is marketed, or how it is described by firm leadership then the firm would be fantastic, however the disconnect between description and reality is mind-bending. as an example - the career trajectory here is described as 'not up or out', yet the compensation model and career counselling is explicitly up-or-out driven. Managers are mostly just really good consultants who have limited managerial training, resulting in extreme micro-management of all of their direct reports. The training routines here are underfunded and offered 1 year too late for most people, regardless of what the training is"

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Former Employee - Designer says

"poor communication, opaque decision making, no opportunity, very corporate"

Former Employee - Anonymous Employee says

"Old computers, good old boy culture, clunky processes"

Former Employee - Graphic Designer says

"When its not toxic or abusive, it's just plain petty leadership that takes no shame in gas lighting. Go ahead and believe your eyes - it really is as bad as it seems here. Leadership at the top is effectively a deer in the headlights when it comes to the behavior seen under his watch. It boggles the mind how a team this large could be lead by people this small. You wont want to believe it because it is in such plain view, and management stands ready to pull the veil in front of you. "Nothing to see here". The faster you get out, the easier it will be. The annual review process is not much more than a shell game even if you do somehow manage to get "promoted". This job will ruin your career if you stay longer than a year."

Former Employee - Executive Assistant says

"Oliver Wyman is deeply committed to a culture of diversity and inclusion that honors the fundamental principles of human dignity, equality, and mutual respect. Employees are urged to address any concerns or complaints of harassment to a manager, Human Capital team member, or our parent company’s Employee Relations Department. Oliver Wyman will thoroughly and fairly investigate reports or complaints of harassment, and will promptly take appropriate remedial action to resolve the problem."

says

"1. Very poor work life balance (despite the programs they love talking about). Expect a culture of constantly being on call, including weekends, nights, holidays, etc. Expect a culture that doesnt let you take time off for a doctors appointment etc without feeling like you are slacking. 2. Lack of Diversity (feels very white male dominated especially at partner and leadership level). I wonder how many Women, African Americans, Hispanic, and LGBT individuals are represented in mid and upper management... In the SF office, I can recall very very very few. 3. Poor alumni relations (McKinsey etc are much better at engaging alumni. Oliver Wyman is not great at this, which cheapens the brand and company network) 4. Very low loyalty to employees - seen more as a worker than a person from my perspective. 5. We often reuse our work/methods between client engagements. It is rare to have a project where you are really doing things fresh."

Former Employee - Anonymous Employee says

"Very light on developing connections or a network. Boring client work. Skill set development is kind of ok, if you want to be an Excel/SAS/Access monkey, but not good on the content side."

Current Employee - Consultant says

"UPDATED: Management just announced changes such that employees will not receive cross-project reviews until they've been at the firm for nearly 2 years. That means you get the same pay, same title, same lack of recognition for 2 years. Their rationale? It balances out in the long run. What this explicitly means: If you're not planning on staying in consulting for the long-run, OW doesn't care about you. Staffing is a nightmare. If you tell ANYONE what your preferences are, everyone somehow hears that you're a whiner and not willing to do whatever the firm needs you to do... Work-life balance is a joke. Upper management talks about it a lot but partners don't care. Weekends? Holidays? What? Zero exit-opportunity support. Again, if you're leaving the firm, they don't care about you. No programs, no externships (I know there are articles on OW's website, but I've never heard of such an opportunity in real life) The firm is perpetually losing money, so terrible bonuses. There's always something to blame it on. My first year's excuse: Tough market. Second year: We spent so much time last year trying to get our act together internally that we forgot to sell work. Whoops. "We'll knock it out of the park next quarter though!""

Former Employee - Consultant says

"- Questionable contracts with clients (most contracts have a highly superfluous end-objectives and seem to be mostly the result of "you scratch my back, I scratch yours" relationships with middle-managers at clients. It is very difficult to demonstrate that they generate any value added to the end clients - Involved in most of the banks and insurance companies that collapsed in the financial crisis, yet refuse to acknowledge their significant responsibility for the disaster. It is rather shocking that they are getting any business since to be honest (e.g. they had a significant role at AIG, Fannie and Freddie, to name a few) - Too many of their consultants are essentially frustrated wannabe-high-financiers, who are eternally attempting to extract high-finance-type salaries in an industry where those pay levels cannot legitimately be supported (unless you are taking advantage of a client through questionable mandates or relationships). This leads to a very unwelcoming and toxic working environment"

Former Employee - Associate says

"Some Associate Partners / Partners utilize a burn-out model with their junior and mid-level consultants. It's not uncommon to work 20-hour days and 30-40 hour weekends. Looking back on the experience, the burn was absolutely unnecessary as it didn't add any value to the client but it was just how the company operated. As an example, after a long workday, an associate partner once asked for a powerpoint deck draft to be completed by midnight (something which should take a few days). Once that was sent, he asked for changes to be completed by 3AM. This was not an important, time-sensitive deck. It was something used as support which the client may or may not have paid attention to. Consultants typically only last a few years and then move on to something sustainable."

Former Employee - says

"Benefits are not good, salary is very low compared to what they ask of you/responsibilites and compared to market. Assistants there should be looked at Project Coordinators due to their workload/exposure to projects. Middle mangement for support departments are horrible and incompetent - there are no reprocussions for unprofessional behavior by upper management. No accountability for middle mangement when they lied in mid-year reviews of assistants."

Associate (Current Employee) says

"Oliver Wyman is the 'sweatshop' boutique consulting firm you have heard about at an international scale. This sweatshop atmosphere is layered on top of a culture where it is difficult to trust/believe anything that individual managers or firm leaders tell you. If everything internally were how it is marketed, or how it is described by firm leadership then the firm would be fantastic, however the disconnect between description and reality is mind-bending. as an example - the career trajectory here is described as 'not up or out', yet the compensation model and career counselling is explicitly up-or-out driven. Managers are mostly just really good consultants who have limited managerial training, resulting in extreme micro-management of all of their direct reports. the training routines here are underfunded and offered 1 year too late for most people (regardless of what the training is)employees are on average nice peopleeverything else"

Senior Consultant (Former Employee) says

"No work life balance Not diverse No opportunities for advancement Good food Very young Very specific culture, outliers not appreciated Good travel perks"

Executive Assistant (Former Employee) says

"Not a good company culture, management does not accept any feedback from employees and they do not look at you as an individual but as a number. Not a good place to work at."

Senior Consultant (Current Employee) says

"Volatile work/life balance Lack of proper support or guidance System is set up success of fresh grads straight out of college, not experienced or lateral hires Decent pay and benefits Smart coworkers"

Associate (Current Employee) says

"OW is a great firm which is changing rapidly. But it is not a place for MBAs to join. They do not know how to manage and develop MBAs and make them an asset for the company."

Consultant (Former Employee) says

"Oliver Wyman is one of the top management consulting firms. Pros: - travel - diversity of projects - talented individuals around you Cons: - no sponsorship of visas for foreign workers - low pay for the SF Bay Area - low ownership of ideas and projects - management considers young consultants as pawns"

CONSULTANT / TECHNICAL SPECIALIST (Former Employee) says

"Very poor management at all levels. Almost no recognition for good work. In most cases knew more than all mamangement levels. Could easily run thus companyAlmos noneSee above"

Executive Assistant (Former Employee) says

"Very Busy for an EA. Lots of day to day responsibilities. They had a lot of activities for team building which was nice. There was a great diversity among the EAs.shortish work day"

Talent Manager (Current Employee) says

"Very respectful consultants who value your work and depend a lot on your decision for them and their career development. Like any typical consulting business its a very time sensitive job which would require weekend work and many late hours."

Manager (Former Employee) says

"The people are pretty cool, but work-life balance is very low for most jobs. This is an up our out culture and most senior managers think everyone is replaceable. Almost no diversity in Senior roles."

Accounting Manager (Former Employee) says

"Enjoyed working there for the most part but the position was very limited and the Accountng systems were very old. The staff and management were ok, but nothing exceptional.Liked the practice area which was financial consulting.Old technology and no advancement."

Designer (Former Employee) says

"I'm not the person to ask about this company because my experience wasn't good toward the end of my tenure. Also, throughout my time there I had a lot of managers which was probably a bad sign given that mismanagement seemed to be a glaring issue there."

Office Services Specialist (Current Employee) says

"Oliver Wyman is a great, fun place to work. There are many social committees to be a part of, and many events and parties to attend. This is a very extroverted place to work, which is great if you are extroverted. Can be very overwhelming for those who prefer to spend their time at work, working."

Regional Office Services Administrator (Current Employee) says

"Day to Day : Mailing Services Stocking of pantry supplies Ensure the office is clean and tidy Office security Pass for visitor and staff Handle Locker Issue Handle Meeting Room Booking Updating Invoice/ scanning invoice into Finance Payment System Conference Account set up New Staff On boarding arrangement / Staff Exit Arrangement Assist Event Team with setting up Happy Hour Event Assist telephonist to screen call for partner / consultants What you learn:ed: I have learned multitasking ,handle urgent request .and nasty callers. Management: My regional head have trust in letting me run the Singapore Office independently with minimum supervision. Workplace Culture: Particular on staff participating in office event like happy hour, regional firm day, or office party. Believe in Diversity and Inclusion Work Hard, Play Hard Hardest Part of the Job: To meet very last min job request The most enjoyable part of the job: Working with a bunch of nice colleaguesManager's trust your ability to deliver the job independentlyVery hard to move up to the next level ."

Case Team Assistant (Former Employee) says

"Fast paced atmosphere. Diverse culture. Positive learning opportunity. Relative transparency. Performance based. Some hierarchy. Work alternates between being "on-the-beach" (free from working on client projects) and functioning on a case.Open Pantry.Variable."

Marketing Coordinator (Former Employee) says

"Too many things have changed at this company from how it was years ago. The management is not competent and they promote the wrong people into positions that shouldn't be promoted."

Engagement Manger (Current Employee) says

"- Deep specialisation in Financial Services - Good culture with very good people - Work / life balance can be bad for some projectsRelatively well comp in early stagesLong hours"

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